Och aye the noo! What a Labour/ SNP coalition could mean for you

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Parliament Street’s Mo Metcalf- Fisher discusses what an SNP- Labour coalition could mean for you. 

If there’s one thing the polls are suggesting this election, it’s that things are mighty close. I guess that’s what makes it all quite exciting. But there are some outcomes the polls suggest, that will no doubt cause concern to many voters.

Certain political outcomes are more obvious than others. The Liberal Democrats are likely to be hit hard and will no doubt lose a good number of their seats; limping back to parliament with only a handful of MPs. UKIP, despite making previous (impressive) rises in opinion polls, look set to take only 1 seat. Suggesting therefore, without meaning to, that many UKIP voters will vote UKIP only to lay the red carpet for Ed Miliband’s arrival to number 10 Downing Street.

Labour, who today look set to come behind the Tories in terms of party size, appear to only be able to go ahead with a coalition government with the controversial Scottish National Party (SNP) led by Nicola Sturgeon. As it stands, Labour’s predicted 269 seats + the SNP’s predicted 49 appear to be a plausible outcome  to securing the closest thing to a working government if the Conservatives are unable to gain a majority.

Despite refusing to rule out a coalition with the SNP, Ed Miliband has recently (somewhat reluctantly) declared that he would not do a deal with the SNP. But looking at the basic maths of parliamentary make up, many have questioned his sincerity. Even Peter Mandleson’s consultancy firm has conceded that a partnership with the SNP is likely and that Labour will have “little choice” if it is to form the next government.

Nicola Sturgeon along with Alex Salmond (who either way come out on top as their party appear set to gain heavily off the back of Labour defeat in Scotland) can’t wait for the prospect of having control over Ed Miliband.

At a recent television debate, Sturgeon excitedly announced I don’t want David Cameron to be Prime Minister, I’m offering to help make Ed Miliband Prime Minister

Shortly after, when speaking at an SNP fundraiser, Alex Salmond  proclaimed  “The Scottish Labour leader will not be writing the Labour Party budget. But then I knew that already – because I’m writing the Labour Party Budget

The SNP’s controversial Alex Salmond is ready to ‘write the Labour Party budget’

But what would an SNP influenced government mean for you?

Higher spending.  SNP MPs will demand an end to austerity. We oppose further spending cuts and propose modest spending increases – of 0.5 per cent above inflation – in each year of the next Parliament. Under our plan, the deficit will still reduce each year, but there will be at least an additional £140 billion across the UK”

According to Treasury costings, this would lead to £148 billion extra government borrowing.

Higher taxes: “We will also look to release additional resources by backing a series of revenue raising measures”.

 Higher welfare benefits:  “Instead, we will vote to increase benefits at least in line with CPI inflation”.

 “We also back increases of at least the cost of living in welfare benefits and believe the roll out of both Personal Independence Payments (PIP) and Universal Credit should be halted”.

Against an EU referendum: Talking about the prospect of being taken out of the EU, Sturgeon claimed that it would be “democratically indefensible” and declared that the SNP would table an amendment to exclude Scotland from the national result if against

 An end to our independent nuclear deterrent:  “A vote for the SNP is a vote to halt progress on Trident renewal, delivering a saving of £100 billion over the next 35 year.”

You can read about why scrapping trident would be detrimental to our national security here

Looking at the above, it actually appears the two have lots in common. They both aren’t too keen on protecting Britain’s defence system; they want to borrow more (meaning the next generation are saddled by deeper debt); they love the EU and are against giving the British people a say via referendum and want to raise taxes.

So if the above is your thing, then the idea of an SNP- Labour coalition will undoubtedly excite you.

If you’re like me and don’t want our nation to be held ransom to Sturgeon and Salmond’s demands, only a Conservative government can guarantee cutting income tax; clearing the deficit; supporting business to create two million more jobs; extending the Right to Buy to housing association tenants; delivering 30 hours of free childcare for working parents; cutting the benefit cap to create three million apprenticeships and increasing the Basic State Pension; giving the British people a much needed referendum on the EU, then use you vote this May to back the Conservatives.

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2 Comments

  1. This is very funny. Did the Conservative party hold the country to ransom after failing to win a majority in the last election? If Labour are so woeful (and they are), then why is the Conservative Party just as unelectable?

    The truth is that the country hase become polarised geographically, and either Scotland or South of England will feel aggrieved if forced to live under a Westminster government they feel they didn’t elect. This is exactly the shake up the electoral system has needed for a long time, and was presaged by the last coalition.

    You can only reap what you sow.

  2. This is very funny. Did the Conservative party hold the country to ransom after failing to win a majority in the last election? If Labour are so woeful (and they are), then why is the Conservative Party just as unelectable?

    The truth is that the country has become polarised geographically, and either Scotland or South of England will feel aggrieved if forced to live under a Westminster government they feel they didn’t elect. This is exactly the shake up the electoral system has needed for a long time, and was presaged by the last coalition.

    You can only reap what you sow.